Anarcho-environmentalism allegorised

The name Anaarkali in the present context has many meanings - Anaar symbolises the anarchism of the Bhils and kali which means flower bud in Hindi stands for their traditional environmentalism. Anaar in Hindi can also mean the fruit pomegranate which is said to be a panacea for many ills as in the Hindi idiom - "Ek anar sou bimar - One pomegranate for a hundred ill people"! - which describes a situation in which there is only one remedy available for giving to a hundred ill people and so the problem is who to give it to. Thus this name indicates that anarcho-environmentalism is the only cure for the many diseases of modern development! Similarly kali can also imply a budding anarcho-environmentalist movement. Finally according to a legend that is considered to be apocryphal by historians Anarkali was the lover of Prince Salim who was later to become the Mughal emperor Jehangir. Emperor Akbar did not approve of this romance of his son and ordered Anarkali to be bricked in alive into a wall in Lahore in Pakistan but she escaped. Allegorically this means that anarcho-environmentalists can succeed in bringing about the escape of humankind from the self-destructive love of modern development that it is enamoured of at the moment and they will do this by simultaneously supporting women's struggles for their rights.

Thursday, January 19, 2017

Agriculture to suit Water Availability

The farm that Subhadra has in Pandutalav has a limited supply of water from a borewell. So she has customised her Rabi sowing to suit this lesser water availability. Not only have the seeds of wheat, linseed, masoor and gram been sown at one feet distance from each other, watering is also being done through a small pipe only at the roots of the plants in limited quantities. This has resulted in more tillering in the case of wheat and more robust growth in the case of the other crops. Since the plants are at a distance from each other, there is space for a bicycle hoe to be driven between them for turning the soil and killing the weeds as shown in the picture below. In the background are perennial redgram plants around the borewell which are also minimally watered so as to ensure that they produce redgram throughout the year for use as vegetables.
This was followed by weeding around the plants and then a special organic fertiliser called Jeevamrit Ghol was applied. This fertiliser is prepared by fermenting a combination of cow dung, cow urine, gram flour and jaggery and then diluting it and applying it to the roots of the plants.
These processes require more labour but they produce more wholesome food with a lesser amount of water. Unfortunately there is no support from the Government for this kind of agriculture and so farmers in general are not prepared to adopt it. Subhadra can do this kind of agriculture as mentioned earlier because she can cross subsidise it from her earnings elsewhere. Its indeed a pity that given the serious problems of water scarcity, mal nourishment, illness due to pesticide and chemical fertiliser infested crops, soil, water and air and the looming crisis of climate change, the Government does not see it fit to support a switch to a more sustainable agricultural regime.

2 comments:

Sadanand Patwardhan said...

Rahul, you may like to look up the link I provide in connection with land tilling.

http://e-girishtractor.blogspot.in/

This is an operator's self weight propered "tractor".

Girish Abhyankar also has written wrong theory.

http://www.vikalpsangam.org/static/media/uploads/Resources/wrong_theory.pdf

Rahul Banerjee said...

This is suitable for ploughing but not for weeding which is what Subhadra is doing with the cycle hoe.